Sample dating headlines for men

“It was just depressing.” Kim chimed in: “I’m on the cusp of turning 30 and people are always complaining that smart women don’t get married.

You never hear about the relationships that are going well, the people who have found a great match.

In 2004, researchers at the University of Michigan published a study in the journal which, loosely summarized, found that the men in their sample would prefer to marry a woman whom they considered to be a subordinate, rather than a woman they considered to be a superior or a peer.

The media went into a feeding frenzy: “Powerful Male Looking for Maid to Marry,” “Glass Ceilings at the Altar as Well as the Boardroom,” “They’re Too Smart for These Guys” cried the news and editorial pages of major dailies nationwide.

The stereotypes are powerful, and many high-achieving women have created similar strategies.

When Zara, a 26-year-old business school student, was an undergraduate at an East Coast Ivy League school, she and her friends used to fabricate identities that they assumed would be more attractive to men. My friends and I pretended we were from Southern Mississippi State University — which doesn’t exist as far as I know — and put on southern accents to top it all off. We thought they’d be intimidated if they found out where we really went to school.

They instinctually “dumb it down” or pretend to be someone they’re not.“I’ve been told by well-meaning relatives: ‘Don’t talk about work on a date, dumb it down, and it’s bad to earn so much money because guys will be scared of you.’ And I got the word ‘intimidating’ a lot,” said Alexis, a 35-year-old lawyer in San Francisco. Nearly half of single women believe their professional success is intimidating to the men they meet.Put another way, many high-achieving women think their success is not helping them find love.“Men Prefer to Wed Secretary” announced UPI newswires in late 2004.“Too Smart to Marry” read the headline in the a few months later.

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